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Ways of treating psoriasis cracks and bleeding

June 19th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Ways of treating psoriasis cracks and bleeding)

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that causes formation of plaques that appears on the skin. Plaques are thickened, dry and reddened areas of the skin that develops scales on the surface. It causes itchiness and burning sensations, and these can crack and bleed and cause pain.

Causes of cracking and bleeding psoriasis

  • The affected areas are very dry due to loss of skin moisture and prone to develop cracks or fissures. The cracks become deepen over time.
  • The cracks become large and extend deeper to the lower level of skin where there are small blood vessels called capillaries. Breaking these capillaries results to bleeding.
  • Common areas in the body that develop plaques and susceptible to cracking and bleeding includes the knees, elbows, soles of the feet and palms of the hands.
  • Rubbing, scratching or scraping of the skin.

    psoriasis

    Common areas in the body that develop plaques and susceptible to cracking and bleeding includes the knees, elbows, soles of the feet and palms of the hands.

  • Regular movements and stretching of the skin

Treatment

  • Stop the bleeding. Apply a steady pressure on the area using a cloth or bandage for at least 10 minutes. Avoid lifting the bandage to check the wound. When bleeding stops, rinse the area using lukewarm or cool water to prevent development of infections.
  • Seal the crack using prescribed liquid bandage. It coats the affected area and it is flexible and waterproof. Bring the edges or cut together and spray or brush the liquid bandage on top of the affected area. The bandage dries in a minute and can last for a week.
  • Prescribed water tight medical tape to close the cracks. It keeps the wound moist for fast healing of the area. Use the sticky part of the bandage to close small cuts. Place bandage across the wound to hold it together.
  • Apply a layer of lip balm or petroleum jelly on small cut to protect the area from further irritations.
  • Soften the dry patches in lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes. Another alternative is adding Epsom salts, oils, colloidal oatmeal and Dead Sea salt to lessen the itchiness and the irritations. Pat dry the skin using a towel and then apply an emollient ointment, oil or cream on the area for fast healing.
  • Before sleeping at night apply ointment such as petroleum jelly on the wound. Cover the area to lock in the moisture overnight. Another alternative is using olive oil, vitamin E and shortening is also good for the condition. Protect the hands and feet by wearing cotton gloves and socks.
  • Moisturize the area at least 2 times every day to keep the area moist.
  • Prescribed medicated lotion, ointment or cream for fast healing of the wounds and prevent development of new ones.
  • Take a bath using warm water mixed with Epsom salt, mineral oil and olive oil. It relaxes the skin and gently removes scales or dead skin from the epidermis or outer layer of the skin.

Overview on an ACL injury

June 4th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Overview on an ACL injury)

An ACL injury is a condition where there is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament which is a major ligament in the knee. This kind of injury is common to those who play sports that involve sudden stops, changes in direction, or jumping.

People who get an ACL injury often hear or feel a “pop” in their knee accompanied by swelling, a feeling of instability and pain that becomes unbearable when bearing weight on the injured leg.

The treatment for an ACL injury depends on the severity of the injury. The treatment may include a break from the sport and a rehabilitation regimen to help restore strength and stability or even surgical intervention to substitute the torn ligament followed by a rehabilitation regimen.

Signs and symptoms of an ACL injury

ACL Injury

Severe knee pain which prevents you from continuing what you were doing.

  • A loud “pop” sound or “popping” sensation in the injured knee
  • Severe knee pain which prevents you from continuing what you were doing
  • Swelling
  • Loss of range of motion
  • Instability or a sensation of “giving away” when bearing weight on the injured leg

Complications

Anyone who previously sustained an ACL injury in their life has an increased risk of developing a disease known as knee osteoarthritis, this causes the joint cartilage to deteriorate while its smooth surface becomes rough. Arthritis can also occur if surgery was done to restructure the ligament.

The severity of the original injury, the presence of related injuries in the knee joint, and/or the level of activity after the treatment are also factors that can influence the risk of arthritis.

Prevention

With proper training of the sport you’re playing and good exercise, this can lower the risk for the injury.

Wearing the appropriate gear for your sport will also help reduce the risk of an ACL injury.

More Information

The details posted on this page on an ACL injury is for learning purposes only. To learn to recognize the signs and how it is treated, enroll in a first aid course with one of our training providers.

Blisters

June 4th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Blisters)

Blisters are bubble-like formations on the epidermis that contains fluid. Blisters are common symptoms of numerous diseases and conditions. Blisters are commonly caused by burns, infections, freezing, and friction on the skin.

The purpose of blisters is to protect and cushion the skin layers below. Serum, plasma, blood or pus can be found inside but this depends on where the blisters are formed. Blisters also help prevent further damage done to the deeper tissues.

It is best to leave one alone to keep the lower layers of the skin protected from infection.

What are the causes?

Blisters

Friction can cause blisters to form on the skin, they usually appear on the hands or feet as these are the areas where repetitive friction mostly occurs due to walking, running or working.

  • Friction can cause blisters to form on the skin, they usually appear on the hands or feet as these are the areas where repetitive friction mostly occurs due to walking, running or working.
  • Extreme temperatures can also cause blisters to form. Examples are second-degree burns as it can form blisters immediately while first-degree burns will form blisters after a few hours the burn occurs.
  • Exposure to chemicals can also cause blisters to form.
  • A ruptured blood vessel can also cause a blister to form. The blood will leak out into the gap between the layers of the skin and cause a blister filled with blood to form.

Certain medical conditions can also lead to blisters as a symptom such as:

Treatment for blisters

Most blisters will heal and disappear without the need for medical treatment. As the fresh skin underneath the blister grows, the fluid inside the blister will steadily vanish and the skin naturally dries and peels off.

It is not recommended to pop the blister as it is a protective layer that helps fend off any infection. If the blister is popped, the wound is open, and bacteria can enter the body through the wound. If a blister bursts, avoid peeling any dead skin on top but instead allow the fluids to drain out naturally and then carefully wash it with a mild soap then wrap the blister and the surrounding area with a clean and sterile dry bandage or dressing.

You can wrap a blister with gauze to protect it from further trauma as it recuperates.

To avoid blisters from occurring at your feet due to friction, wear footwear that is well-fitted and comfortable with clean socks.

To avoid blisters on your hands, wear protective clothing such as gloves to reduce the friction on the skin when doing manual work or handling tools.

Remedies for blood clot in the eye

June 4th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Remedies for blood clot in the eye)

Blood clot in the eye is bleeding under the conjunctiva or the outer protective coating of the eyeball in the eye. It gradually changes color and disappear but sometimes blood clots in the eye can be caused by injuries and needs to be treated.

The white portion of the eye is layered by the conjunctiva with blood vessels and nerves. The blood vessels behind the eyes are very delicate and can easily rupture and result to blood clots. If not properly treated can cause a blurred vision and eventually reduced eye sight. Blood clots can also form in new born babies caused by changes in the pressure in the body of the infant during childbirth.

Causes

  • Eye injury
  • Constipation
  • Excessive strain on the eye

    blood clot

    Red spot or patch on the white area of the eye.

  • Excessive sneezing or coughing
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Medications such as blood thinners when taken excessively
  • Blood clotting disorders
  • Deficiency in Vitamin K
  • Over stressed
  • Severe infection of the eye

Symptoms

  • Red spot or patch on the white area of the eye
  • Eye pain
  • Itchiness or irritations in the eye
  • Sensation of fullness in the eye or under the eyelid
  • Blurred vision

Treatment

  • Prescribed lubrication for the eyes such as artificial tears to soothe the eyes. Avoid rubbing the eyes to prevent further irritations and worsen the condition.
  • Place a hot compress on the eyelid to lessen the pain and the irritations. Soak a clean facecloth in hot water. Place it in a plastic bag and then place it across the area for at least 5-7 times every day.
  • Soak a clean wash cloth in cold water. Wring out excess water from the cloth and then place it directly on the area for at least 1-2 minutes to lessen blood clots and the pain. Another alternative is wrapping ice cubes in a towel and compress the eye and splashing cold water into the affected eyes is also good for the condition. Repeat this process at least 4-5 times for 8-10 minutes.
  • Heat 2 glasses of water and add 1 tablespoon of salt. Stir well until salt is fully dissolved. Let the solution cool down to room temperature. Wash the affected eye thoroughly using this solution at least 2-3 times every day to flush out foreign particles and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Prescribed antibiotic eye drop if the blood clot in the eye is caused by external infections.
  • Regular exercises by walking briskly for at least 30-45 minutes every day to increase blood circulation and dissolve and prevents formation of blood clots. Low impact aerobic exercises such as dancing, roller skating, swimming and cargo training equipment are also good for the condition.

Remedies for puss caterpillar sting

June 4th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Remedies for puss caterpillar sting)

The puss caterpillar or woolly slug is the most poisonous caterpillar. The sting causes sudden pain that can be severe and radiating. The affected area develops erythema and swelling and within 2-3 hours becomes a grid-like pattern of hemorrhagic papules. The condition usually last for 1-2 days.

Symptoms of puss caterpillar sting

  • Throbbing pain
  • Burning sensations
  • Development of rashes
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever
  • Muscle cramps and seizures
  • Erythematous spots

    puss caterpillar sting

    Wash thoroughly the area using soap and hot water to flush out remaining hair and toxins present in the surface of the skin.

  • Swelling
  • Abdominal pain
  • Lymphadenitis
  • Headache
  • Shock
  • Respiratory distress

Treatment

  • Remove the puss caterpillar and avoid touching it. Use pliers or tweezers or wear thick gloves to pick up the caterpillar. Avoid picking them up with bare hand to prevent further irritation and delay the healing.
  • Once there is burning and itching sensation, stay calm and relaxed. Avoid moving around to prevent the fast spreading of the venom to other areas of the body and worsen the condition.
  • Place an adhesive tape or cellophane over the affected area. Strip the tape repeated at least once or twice to remove hair of the caterpillar.
  • Wash thoroughly the area using soap and hot water to flush out remaining hair and toxins present in the surface of the skin.
  • Place ice cubes in a plastic bag. Wrap it in a towel or a cloth before placing over the affected area for at least 5-10 minutes every 2 hours to lessen the swelling, the pain and the burning sensation. Another alternative is using bag of frozen vegetable such as corn or peas is also good for the condition.
  • Prescribed antihistamines medications to lessen the severe itching and other symptoms.
  • Apply isopropyl alcohol or rubbing alcohol to the sting to lessen the pain and the itchiness.
  • Prescribe topical corticosteroids to lessen the severity of the inflammation.
  • Make a paste by mixing baking soda and a few drops of water. Mix them well and apply it directly on the area to lessen severe itchiness and mild skin reactions.
  • Prescribed pain medications to lessen severe pain and headache.
  • Get a tetanus vaccination within 72 hours after stung by a caterpillar to prevent the risk of developing infections.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on a puss caterpillar sting is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the signs and how it is treated by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

ACL Injury

May 21st, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on ACL Injury)

An ACL injury is a condition where there is a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament, a major ligament in the knee. This kind of injury is common to those who play sports that involve sudden stops, changes in direction, or jumping – such as basketball, football, soccer, tennis, volleyball, and gymnastics.

People who get an ACL injury often hear or feel a “pop” in their knee accompanied by swelling, a feeling of instability and pain that becomes unbearable when bearing weight on the injured leg.

The treatment for an ACL injury depends on the severity of the injury. The treatment may include rest and a rehabilitation regimen to restore strength and stability back or surgery to replace the damaged ligament followed by a rehabilitation program.

Signs and symptoms of an ACL injury:

  • A loud “pop” sound or “popping” sensation in the injured knee

    ACL Injury

    Severe knee pain which prevents you from continuing what you were doing.

  • Severe knee pain which prevents you from continuing what you were doing
  • Swelling
  • Loss of range of motion
  • Instability or a sensation of “giving away” when bearing weight on the injured leg

What causes an ACL injury?

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the two ligaments that cross in the middle of the knee which connects your femur to your tibia and helps stabilize your knee joint. Most of the ACL injuries occur during sports or fitness activities that put a lot of stress on the knee, examples are:

  • Abruptly slowing down and changing directions
  • Turning with your foot firmly fixed on the ground
  • Landing from a jump erroneously
  • Abrupt stopping motion
  • Sustaining a direct strike or heavy force to the knee, such as a collision

More Information

The details posted on this page on ACL injury is for learning purposes only. To learn to recognize and manage – enroll in a first aid course with one of our training providers.

Cellulitis

April 16th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Cellulitis)

Cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that can be potentially serious. This condition typically appears as a swollen and red rash that is painful and warm to the touch. Cellulitis usually occurs on the skin located at the lower legs but can also occur in other parts of the body such as the face and arms. Cellulitis arises if bacteria enters your body through a break in your skin. If left untreated, cellulitis can be life-threatening as it can spread to your lymph nodes and bloodstream. Cellulitis is however not contagious, which means it cannot spread from person to person.

Cellulitis is a common disease and can affect anyone at any age or race, however, cellulitis is more common in middle-aged and elderly people.

At times, cellulitis appears in the area where there is a break in the skin, such as skin near surgical wounds or skin ulcers.

The common types of bacteria responsible for cellulitis are named Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, but there are other types of bacteria that can also cause cellulitis from happening.

Common causes of cellulitis:

  • Injuries that tear or break the skin
  • Infections that occur after surgery
  • Skin conditions like eczema or chickenpox
  • Dirty foreign objects in the skin
  • Bone infections

    Cellulitis

    An area of the skin that is discolored red that tends to expand.

Signs and symptoms of cellulitis:

  • An area of the skin that is discolored red that tends to expand
  • Swelling
  • Tenderness
  • Pain
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Red spots on the skin
  • Formation of blisters on the skin
  • Skin dimpling

There are numerous risk factors that contribute to increasing the chances of contracting cellulitis, these include:

  • Diabetes
  • A break in the skin
  • Circulatory problems
  • Liver disease
  • Skin disorders like eczema

It is important that you know how to identify the signs and symptoms of cellulitis and once you do, you should seek medical attention immediately. Seek immediate care if:

  • You notice a red, swollen rash on your skin that rapidly changes in size
  • You develop a fever with the symptoms

You should still see your doctor even you don’t have a fever but a red rash that constantly changes in size. Do not wait for more symptoms to appear before you seek medical attention as it can get worse over time if left untreated and potentially become fatal.

Cellulitis is usually treated with antibiotics through oral intake or intravenous method.

 

Handlebar palsy

April 10th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Handlebar palsy)

Handlebar palsy is usually common with long-distance cyclists. The ulnar nerve in the wrist is compressed caused by a prolonged period of direct pressure placed on the nerve especially the weight of the upper body resting on the handlebar during cycling. It causes inflammation and irritation of the nerve caused by shock and vibration placed on the arms during cycling. This condition usually common in off-road and mountain biking.

Causes

  • Compression of the ulnar nerve due to improper positioning of the wrist on the handlebars.
  • Ulnar nerve on the wrist becomes compressed.
  • Repetitive movements of the wrist or elbow
  • Performing sports activities that requires weight lifting, biking and throwing
  • Compression or disruption of the ulnar nerve in the elbow due to trauma, bone spurs, arthritis and cysts.

Symptoms of handlebar palsy

Handlebar palsy

Difficulty performing functions of hand such as using a pen, holding an object or playing musical instrument such as piano.

  • Clawing of the hand
  • Difficulty moving the affected fingers
  • Difficulty performing functions of hand such as using a pen, holding an object or playing musical instrument such as piano.
  • Affects the outer half of the ring finger and the little finger and the outer area of the hand.
  • Pain with wrist movements
  • Difficulty making the ring and pinky finger straight of the affected hand.
  • Lack of coordination or clumsiness of the affected hand
  • Numbness, weakness and tingling sensations can be felt

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest for fast healing of the condition.
  • Apply ice on the affected area. Wrap ice pack in a towel or a cloth before placing to the area for at least 10-15 minutes for 2-4 hours to lessen the pain and the inflammation. Another alternative if ice pack is not available use bag of frozen vegetable such as corn or peas is good for the condition.
  • Wear prescribed splint on the affected area to lessen further irritation on the ulnar nerve, prevent unnecessary movements and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Take prescribed oral and topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications to lessen the pain and the inflammation.
  • Prescribed cortisone injections to lessen the pain, the inflammation and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Perform rehabilitation exercises with the help of the physical therapist to strengthen muscles of the hand and lessen the pain.

Tips

  • Maintain proper set-up and riding posture to prevent shifting of the weight too far forward.
  • Wear padded gloves to absorb sweat and prevent hands from slipping off from the handles and cause injury. It also protects other areas of the wrist which receives all the pressure during biking.
  • Switch position of the hand on the bike for at least every 15 minutes. Use padded handlebars to lessen pressure placed on the hand.
  • Stretch both front and back of wrist at least 3 times every day to lessen the symptoms after every ride.

Treating sun allergy

April 3rd, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Treating sun allergy)

A sun allergy is a reaction of the immune system to sunlight usually causes a red and itchy rash. It affects the “V” of the neck, outside area of the arm, back of the hands and the lower legs. Sometimes it causes severe reactions such as development of small blisters and hives that spread to other areas of the skin which are covered with clothing.

Types of sun allergy

  • Polymorphous light eruption is an itchy rash on the affected area of the skin.
  • Actinic prurigo or hereditary PMLE – the symptom is more severe and begins earlier usually during childhood or adolescence. A family history of the condition
  • Photoallergic eruption – caused by effect of sunlight on a chemical applied on the skin such as fragrances, sunscreen, cosmetics and antibiotic ointments. Tetracyclines and sulfonamides used for psychiatric medications can also cause this condition.
  • Solar urticaria – develops hives or large, itchy and red bumps on exposed areas of the skin. It usually affects young women.

Symptoms

sun allergy

Apply cold compress on the affect to lessen the burning sensations, redness of the area and for fast healing of the condition.

  • Redness, itching and pain
  • Small bumps that becomes raised patches
  • Blisters or hives
  • Inflamed skin
  • Pain and tingling sensations
  • Fever and chills
  • Swelling of the face
  • Fatigue
  • Dehydration
  • Nausea
  • Headache and dizziness

Treatment

  • Apply cold compress on the affect to lessen the burning sensations, redness of the area and for fast healing of the condition. Soak a clean towel in cool water and place it directly on the blisters. Another alternative is taking a cool water bath is good for the condition. After taking a bath, apply aloe Vera gel on the blisters to relieve of the symptoms.
  • Cover the blisters using clean and dry bandages to prevent development of bacterial infections.
  • Drink a glass of cold water to keep the body hydrated. It helps in restoring the fluids lost due to sun burns. Eat fruits such as watermelon which is good in hydrating the body.
  • Use the prescribed cortisone cream to lessen the itchiness and pain of the affected area.
  • Prescribed oral histamine to heal hives and lessen the itchiness and the redness of the skin.
  • Apply a cold milk compress to the affected area. Soak a clean cloth in cold milk and then dab the cloth on the affected areas for at least 30 minutes to lessen the itchiness and the pain. Rinse off the milk using cold water, pat the area dry and then apply moisturizers in the area to prevent drying of the skin.
  • Apply lip balm on the lips with SPF 30 and above to lessen effects of sun allergy on the area.
  • Apply sun block on the skin with sun protection factor or SPF of 15 or higher. It protects the skin from exposure to both ultra violet A or UVA and ultraviolet B or UVB rays.

Avulsion

March 30th, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Avulsion)

An avulsion is a serious injury where the skin has been partially or fully torn off. These wounds can bleed heavily and rapidly and must be treated immediately. This is commonly caused by a fall, accident, or another injury. In this case, the skin that was torn must be removed as the skin is too damaged to be naturally repaired by the body. Because the skin is torn off, stitching of this wound is not possible because of missing tissue. These wounds are usually large and leave scars because of the missing tissue.

It is recommended to immediately seek medical attention when you receive an avulsion wound.

Taking care of the wound:

  • Wash the wound to disinfect it, remove any dirt and debris from the wound
  • Control and stop the bleeding by applying pressure and elevation to the wound
  • Wrap the wound with a clean bandage

You can also take painkillers to ease the pain that is accompanied by the wound, but you may need to talk to your doctor about what kind of medication you should take if you have an allergy to medication or complications.

Avulsion

Wash the wound to disinfect it, remove any dirt and debris from the wound.

Keep the wound and your bandage clean and dry for at least a week, ensure that you have enough nutrition and rest for the wound.

While most wounds can be treated at home without the need to see a doctor, you may be required to see one if the injury is serious and can be determined by some factors.

See a doctor when:

  • The wound is large and is deeper than half an inch
  • The bleeding doesn’t stop even after you’ve applied pressure
  • The bleeding has continued for more than half an hour
  • The injury was a result of a serious accident

There are numerous techniques for treating the wound. Your doctor may close the wound by using stitches, sutures or skin glue. You may also receive a tetanus shot to prevent you from contracting tetanus.

If you’ve received bandages or dressings as suggested by your doctor, you should keep your hands clean always to prevent infection as you change your bandages or dressings. Do this in a clean or sterile environment, disinfect the wound and keep it dry before applying a new bandage or dressing. Safely dispose of your used bandages or dressings in a plastic bag.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on an avulsion is for learning purposes only. Learn how it is managed by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.