Standard First Aid Training, Courses and Re-Certifications.
Header

Remedies for boxer’s fracture

December 11th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Remedies for boxer’s fracture)

A boxer’s fracture is a break through the bones of hands that forms the knuckles. The fractures happen in the metacarpal bone that attaches the ring finger or the little finger to the wrist known as the fourth and the fifth metacarpal bones.

It can also cause a break in the neck of the second and third metacarpal bones. The second metacarpal bone attaches the index finger to the wrist, and the third metacarpal attaches the middle finger to the wrist.

Causes of boxer’s fracture

Punching a hard object or a wall with a closed fist but can also happen when the hand is not closed and strikes a hard object.

The stress on the bone will result to a break in the weakest part which is the neck of the bone, found below the knuckle.

boxers-fracture

Punching a hard object or a wall with a closed fist but can also happen when the hand is not closed and strikes a hard object.

Symptoms

  • Severe pain or tenderness of the affected area
  • Depressed knuckle
  • Pain with movement of the hand or fingers
  • Snapping or popping sensation can be felt in the affected bone
  • The hand swelling, discolored or bruise around the injured area
  • Deformity of the broken bone or the knuckle
  • Abnormal movement of the fragments of the broken bone
  • Sometimes, the fracture can cause a cut in the skin which needs immediate treatment

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected area. Avoid performing activities that further irritates the area and worsen the condition.
  • Apply ice on the area. Ice can be in the form of an ice pack. Wrap ice in a towel or a piece of cloth before placing to the area for at least 10-15 minutes to lessen the swelling and the pain. If ice is not available, another alternative is soaking a clean towel in cold water, and then place to the affected area is good for the condition.
  • Elevate the area above the level of the heart to lessen the swelling. When lying down, raise the area in couple of pillows to keep it elevated.
  • Wash cuts in the affected area using soap and water immediately and cover it with clean bandage to lessen the risk of developing infections and worsen the condition.
  • Immobilize the area by using a splint to prevent unnecessary movement and prevent causing damage to surrounding muscles, tendons, blood vessels, ligaments and nerves. Keep splint dry all the time to maintain their strength.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medications such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lessen the pain and the swelling.

Tips

  • Avoid situations in which an injury can happen such as fist fights and punching a hard object due to anger or frustration to lessen the risk of a boxer’s fracture.
  • Performing regular exercises and taking calcium supplements to lessen the weakening of the bones that happens naturally due to age.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on a boxer’s fracture is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the indications and how it is managed by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

Remedies for retrolisthesis

July 31st, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Remedies for retrolisthesis)

Retrolisthesis is a rare medical condition usually happens in the lower area of the spine, but can also happen in the cervical area and rarely in the thoracic region. This condition happens when the disc found between the vertebrae is damaged.

Retrolisthesis happens when one vertebra slides and moves back throughout the intervertebral disc under or over it.

Types of retrolisthesis

retrolisthesis

Uneasiness in one area of the back.

  • Complete retrolisthesis, when a vertebra moves backward to the spinal segments above and below.
  • Partial retrolisthesis, when a vertebra moves backwards either to the spinal segment above or below.
  • Stair stepped retrolisthesis when a vertebra moves backwards to the body of spinal segment found above and ahead of the one found below.

Symptoms of retrolisthesis

  • Distortion of the spine or a bulge in the back
  • Uneasiness in one area of the back
  • Limited range of motion
  • Back pain
  • Other forms of pain in area of displacement
  • Numbness, tingling or a severe and pinched pain felt in the buttocks, hips, thigh, neck, shoulder, legs and arms.

Causes

  • Stress and traumatic fractures
  • Birth defects in children
  • Injury to the spine or around the spine
  • Arthritis, osteoporosis and rickets which makes the bones weak
  • Nutritional deficiencies of materials for maintenance of bone strength, and repair of disc, cartilage and nerves.
  • Weak core muscles that do not give stability on the back
  • Infections in the blood or bone

Treatment

  • Quit smoking to prevent further damage and deterioration of the joint.
  • If overweight, lose some weight to lessen the pressure placed on the vertebra and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Take prescribe vitamin supplement with manganese, copper, vitamin A, C and Zinc.
  • Using myofascial release with the help of the physical therapist. It is an applied kinesiology treatment that involves placing pressure on myofascial which result in restorative function. Myofascial release or massages restores the muscle tone and increase blood circulation in the area.
  • Using microcurrent therapy to lessen the pain and repair of the tissue. it utilizes low-level electric currents to lessen the inflammation, the swelling and the pain. It also releases muscle trigger points and improve regeneration of the soft tissue.
  • Apply a warm compress on the affected area for at least 10-15 minutes to lessen the pain.
  • Seek the help of the physical therapist for some proper techniques in lifting, bending and sitting. Exercises and physical therapy helps with losing weight and improve flexibility, mobility, strength and lessen the pain caused by the retrolisthesis.
  • Drink plenty of water. Water is a constituent of spinal disc cartilage and supports the height of the intervertebral disc.

 

Dealing with broken ribs

April 7th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Dealing with broken ribs)

Broken ribs usually happen due to a direct blow to the chest or torso such as in vehicular accidents, falls and during contact sports. Conditions such as osteoarthritis and bone cancer can cause weakening of the ribs and other bones.

Symptoms of broken ribs

  • Pain when breathing
  • Mild to severe pain near the rib cage
  • Headaches and fatigue
  • Shortness of breath and feeling restless, dizzy, sleepy, anxious and scared.
  • Pain in the rib when coughing excessively due to conditions such as osteoarthritis or cancer.

    Broken rib

    Mild to severe pain near the rib cage is an indication of a broken rib.

Treatment

  • Avoid wrapping the rib cage.
  • Apply an ice pack on the affected area for at least 20 minutes every hour in the first 2 days and reduce it to 10-20 minutes at 3 times every day to lessen the swelling and pain. The cold temperature will constrict the blood vessels to lessen the inflammation and numbs the surrounding nerves. Avoid placing the pack directly on the skin to prevent further damage and worsen the condition.
  • After 48 hours, apply heat on the affected area to relieve the spasms of the intercostal muscles found between the ribs. Apply heat at least 30-minute intervals and let the muscles cool down for 30 minutes and reapply again. Avoid placing heat directly on the skin to prevent burns. Wrap heat using a towel or piece of cloth before placing to the area.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter non-steroidal and anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, naproxen or aspirin to lessen the pain and inflammation.
  • Minimize performing cardio exercises to prevent an increase in the heart and breathing rates that can result to irritation and inflammation of the broken rib. Minimize twisting and lateral flexion of the torso while the rib is in the healing stage. Perform gentle exercises such as walking, driving and desk work.
  • When coughing or sneezing, hold a soft pillow against the chest to provide cushion to the blow and lessen the pain.
  • Sleep on the back or supine position to lessen the pressure on the chest. Another alternative is sleeping in an upright reclining chair for a few days until the inflammation and pain is minimized. Another option is placing pillows behind the back and at the back of the head while sleeping.
  • Eat well-balanced foods rich in minerals and vitamins. Consume whole grains, lean meats, dairy products and plenty of purified water. Take dietary supplements such as calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and K and phosphorus for fast healing of the broken rib.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on broken ribs is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize and manage rib injuries by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

Managing a spinal cord injury

March 17th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Managing a spinal cord injury)

The spinal cord injury is considered dangerous due to the vital function of the area. The injury happens when there is injury to the spinal cord due to trauma, compression due to a tumor or infection and loss of normal supply of blood. These injuries can be complete or incomplete.

In a complete injury, it involves total loss of function of the muscles and sensation in the body beneath the level of the injury. As for an incomplete injury, there is still remaining function below the level of the injury. Both sides of the body are usually affected equally.

Injury to the upper area of spinal cord such as in the neck can result to quadriplegia where both arms and legs becomes paralyzed. As for injury in the lower back, it can result to paraplegia which is paralysis of both legs only.

Symptoms of spinal cord injury

  • Paralysis and loss of sensation
  • Shallow or irregular breathing
  • Loss of urinary or bowel control
  • Pain or severe stinging sensations
  • Exaggerated reflex actions or spasms

    Spinal cord injury

    Pain or severe stinging sensations is an indication of a spinal cord injury.

Causes

  • Stabbing or gunshot wounds to the spine
  • Falling from heights
  • Injuries in sports such as in football, diving, equestrian and rugby
  • People suffering from spinal stenosis have a high risk of injury to the spinal cord

Treatment

  • Avoid moving the affected person. Keep the head, neck and back in proper alignment. Lay him/her on a flat surface and keep the person calm and still. Roll up towels and place them on side of the neck or hold the head and neck in place
  • If the person does not have a pulse, gently lift the jaw forward and perform chest compression.
  • A spinal injury in the upper neck area can result to loss of control in normal breathing and there is a need to use a breathing tube and ventilator. A breathing machine or mechanical ventilator helps with breathing and provides oxygen.
  • Wear a cervical collar or place the affected neck on a backboard to prevent unnecessary movements that can worsen the condition.
  • Take the prescribed dosage of steroid to lessen the swelling and inflammation.
  • Place the affected person in a traction or halo device placed around the head for stability of the spine and prevent further damage that can worsen the condition.
  • Some possible complications that can result from a spinal cord injury that needs to be treated immediately includes bowel incontinence or inability in controlling bowel movements, urinary tract infections or urinary incontinence, blood clots, pneumonia, chronic pain, pressure sores, depression and muscle spasms.
  • After the affected person is already stabilized, seek the help of a physical therapist for some rehabilitation exercises to restore normal mobility of the affected area through occupational and physical therapy and using assistive devices.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on a spinal cord injury is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize and manage head and back injuries by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

How to manage a concussion

October 14th, 2016 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on How to manage a concussion)
Concussion

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury that alters the way the brain functions which is only temporary and the person experiences headaches and problems with concentration, coordination, balance and memory.

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgChTeALF7g”]

A concussion is usually brought about by a blow to the head and the upper body is strongly shaken, especially when playing sports such as football.

Symptoms of a concussion

  • Clumsiness
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headache
  • Blurred vision
  • Sensitivity to light and noise
  • Confusion and feeling dazed

    Concussion

    A concussion is usually brought about by a blow to the head and the upper body is strongly shaken, especially when playing sports such as football.

  • Problems with balance or dizziness
  • Memory loss
  • Sluggishness
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Changes in personality

Types of concussion

  • Grade 1 – the symptoms can last less than 15 minutes without loss of consciousness.
  • Grade 2 – there is no loss of consciousness and symptoms last for more than 15 minutes.
  • Grade 3 – there is loss of consciousness for only a few seconds.

Treatment

  • Apply an ice pack on the affected area to lessen the swelling on a minor injury. Avoid applying the pack directly on the skin to prevent frostbite. Wrap the ice pack with a towel before applying on the area for at least every 2-4 hours for 20-30 minutes.
  • Avoid applying pressure to any head trauma wound to prevent pushing bone splinters into the brain.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medication such as acetaminophen. Avoid taking medications such as ibuprofen and aspirin to prevent bruising and making the bleeding worse.
  • If the victim is awake, keep asking questions to assess the degree of the injury and keep the victim awake.
  • Stay with the victim on the initial 24 hours. Do not leave him/her alone and check the physical and cognitive functions for any changes. If the victim wants to sleep, wake him/her up every 15 minutes for the first 2 hours and every 30 minutes for the next 2 hours and then hourly.
  • Avoid performing strenuous activities for days after the injury and avoid being stressed to give the brain time to rest and promote fast healing of the injury.
  • Avoid driving any vehicle until the condition is fully healed.
  • Take plenty of rest and avoid reading, watching TV, playing video games and other mental tasks.

If the symptoms still persist and continue to worsen within 7-10 days, seek medical help immediately.

Tips

  • Wear protective gear when playing sports and other recreational activities. Wear the appropriate protective gear while playing sports.
  • When riding a vehicle, always use the seat belt.
  • Block all stairways and install window guards to prevent small children from falling or slipping.
  • Perform exercises regularly to strengthen the muscles in the legs and improve balance.

More Information

The details posted on this page on concussions is for learning purposes only. To learn to recognize and manage head injuries including a concussion, enroll in a first aid course with one of our training providers.

How to manage a hairline fracture of the wrist

October 7th, 2016 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on How to manage a hairline fracture of the wrist)
aquagenic-urticaria

Hairline fractures of the wrist involves a fine line of breakage on the skin. It is a minor condition that does not affect the normal alignment of the bone and there is no separation.

Gymnasts, basketball players, tennis players and divers are prone to overuse the wrist and result to a hairline fracture of the wrist. These fractures are likely to occur among women above the age of 40. Women playing sports are also prone to these fractures due to eating disorders such as anorexia, osteoporosis and irregular menstruation.

Causes of hairline fracture of the wrist

  • Trauma or injury on the wrist
  • Repetitive use of the area
  • A strong force on the wrist

    Hairline fracture

    Pain can be felt at the wrist joint and becomes severe when moving the wrist such as writing or holding an object.

  • Sudden falls

Symptoms

  • Pain can be felt at the wrist joint and becomes severe when moving the wrist such as writing or holding an object.
  • Bruising of the affected area which happens when blood leaks in the blood vessel of the bone and other tissues. The bruise appears blue or greenish in color and eventually darkens. It will remain for a few days and eventually disappears.
  • Wrist joint and the palm are swollen
  • Tingling sensation or loss of sensation on the affected area
  • A limited movement of the wrist joint

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected area.
  • Apply an ice pack on the affected area for at least 20 minutes to lessen swelling and pain. Avoid applying ice directly on the skin to prevent frostbite and making the condition worse.
  • Place a compression bandage to prevent swelling of the injured area. There are bandages and special tapes that are used for compression and avoid wrapping it too tight to prevent any disruption in the blood circulation in the area.
  • Elevate the affected area above the level of the heart to lessen the swelling, inflammation, pain and promote proper blood circulation in the area for at least 2 days.
  • Drink warm milk added with a teaspoon of turmeric powder every day for fast healing of the condition.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medication such as acetaminophen, aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen to lessen the pain and inflammation.
  • Eat foods rich in calcium to strengthen the bones

Treated hairline fracture of the wrist heals without complication. Sometimes, the affected individual experiences stiffness for a month and there is a need to move the fingers to prevent stiffness of the area.

Seek medical help immediately if there are any abnormal symptoms such as the nerve can become overstimulated after a fracture and result to a painful condition known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Tendons will rupture and there is limited movement of the thumb or finger. The capsule of the wrist joint is stretched or has tears. Fluid of the wrist can swell and result to a ganglion cyst and the ligaments found between the carpal bones can have tears that result to a painful movement.

More Information

The details posted on this page on hairline fracture of the wrist is for learning purposes only. To learn to recognize and manage various types of fractures including a hairline fracture of the wrist, enroll in a first aid course with one of our training providers.

Treating a broken finger

October 7th, 2016 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Treating a broken finger)
fibrositis

A broken finger happens when one or more of the bones in the fingers called phalanges break. Each finger has 3 phalanges, except the thumb which has only 2 phalanges. The injury is usually caused by an injury to the hand and can happen in any phalanges such as a fall while playing sports, fingers caught in the doors of cars and other injuries on the fingers.  This condition can also happen in the knuckles where the joints and bones of the finger meet.

A broken finger is categorized into the following:

  • Avulsion fracture where the ligament or tendon moves away from the main bone
  • Impacted fracture is a break in the bone due to trauma and twisting caused by muscle spasms
  • Shear fracture where the bone splits in 2 when moving in 2 different directions.

Symptoms of a broken finger

Broken finger

Within the next 5-10 minutes, there is bruising and swelling on the affected area

  • Pain felt at the affected area
  • Within the next 5-10 minutes, there is bruising and swelling on the affected area
  • If the fracture is severe, bruising from the leakage blood can be seen
  • Swelling that becomes severe will result to numbness of the finger due to the compressed nerves in the area.

Treatment

  • Apply an ice pack on the affected finger. Wrap the ice pack in a small towel and apply on the affected finger to lessen the bruising and swelling. Avoid applying an ice pack directly on the skin to prevent frostbite and making the condition worse.
  • Elevate the affected finger above the level of the heart to lessen the swelling and bleeding.
  • Remove any jewelry on the fingers before the area swells to prevent difficulty in removing these items.
  • Immobilize the affected finger with a splint to prevent unnecessary movement and for fast healing of the area. Use a medical tape to wrap the stick and the finger. Avoid wrapping too tightly to prevent any disruption of the blood circulation and making the condition worse.
  • If there is an open wound on the finger, seek medical help immediately to prevent any infection that can be caused by bacteria that enters the wound.
  • Avoid using the affected finger while still in the healing process such as bathing, eating, and picking up objects. Avoid any unnecessary movement or disturbance of the splint for fast healing of the area
  • Start moving the fingers gently when it is already out of the splint to prevent making the area stiff.
  • Seek the help of a physical therapist for some rehabilitation exercises for the hand to keep the fingers moving and restore mobility.

More Information

The details posted on this page on broken finger is for learning purposes only. To learn to recognize and manage bone injuries including a broken finger enroll in a first aid course with one of our training providers.

Stress fracture of the foot

February 13th, 2016 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Stress fracture of the foot)
Achilles-tendon-rupture

Stress fracture of the foot is a common problem among athletes. A stress fracture is a crack in the bone with a width of a hair follicle, but causes discomfort especially when it is a weight bearing bone like in the foot. Stress fractures are common in the feet and usually among runners, dancers and basketball players. Stress fracture can be a serious condition if not properly treated, but it takes time to heal a stress fracture of the foot.

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gj8KQayD4Pw”]

Symptoms of stress fracture of the foot usually begin with slight discomforts on the front part of the foot where most of the force and pressure is being exerted. The pain is very mild and it becomes worse during long periods of exercises, working out and running. The pain normally disappears when the affected person stops performing long periods of strenuous activities.

Treatment

  • Stop performing exercises and running or whatever is causing the pain.
  • Get plenty of rest especially the affected foot. Wear a boot or use crutches to help promote fast healing of the area and keep weight away and pressure off the affected foot.

    Stress fracture of the foot

    Get plenty of rest especially the affected foot.

  • Apply an ice pack or pack of frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel and place on the affected foot for 20 minutes and avoid making it more than 20 minutes. Repeat the procedure at least 3-4 times every day to help lessen the swelling.
  • Wrap the affected foot using an elastic bandage and elevate the foot above the level of the heart in order to help lessen swelling and inflammation.
  • Take the prescribed pain medications such as acetaminophen in order to help lessen the pain.
  • Begin performing some low-impact exercises such as biking or swimming as well as strengthening exercises.
  • Seek the help of a physical therapist for the suitable rehabilitation program for strengthening exercises on the foot since weakness of these areas can be affected by foot-impact forces. Stretching the leg and muscles of the hip helps in restoring the flexibility of the area and performing balance exercises helps in improving stability of the whole body. There should be a rest period between exercises in order to help continue the repair of bone.
  • Wear properly cushioned footwear with proper support for the foot.
  • Eat a well balanced diet and adequate amounts of food rich in Vitamin D and calcium or take vitamin D and calcium supplements.

Tips

  • Avoid performing intense workouts to prevent foot stress fracture. Warm up and stretch thoroughly before performing a workout and take a rest between workouts in order to help rest the body and bones. Proper use of exercise equipment can help prevent stress fractures.
  • Avoid wearing worn-out shoes or with insufficient arch support when performing high-impact sports.

Avulsion fracture of the elbow

February 13th, 2016 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Avulsion fracture of the elbow)
aquagenic-urticaria

Avulsion fracture happens when a ligament or tendon that is connected to a bone partially detaches by taking a bone fragment with it due to trauma or injury. These usually happen due to a strong contraction of the muscle. It develops at the ligament due to an external force to the body such as a fall or pulls at the tendon due to the contraction of muscles that is stronger than the force that is connecting the bones together.

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJA0mCek7LE”]

In children, avulsion fracture usually happens in areas of the bone that is made up of cartilages. Among adults, the ligaments and tendons are first to be injured while in children, the bone will weaken before the ligament or tendon is damaged. Children have a weak part in their skeleton called the growth plate which is the area of the bone that is still actively growing. The tendons or ligaments that are near a growth plate can be pulled strongly enough to cause the growth plate to be fractured. These fractures are not serious and easily treated unless the fracture has tendon or ligament damage.

Symptoms

  • Discomfort on the affected area
  • There is swelling and inflammation

    Avulsion fracture

    Pain that is mild to severe and the intensity depends on the amount of damage caused

  • Pain that is mild to severe and the intensity depends on the amount of damage caused
  • Sensitivity of the affected area when touched
  • Difficulty in moving the affected area

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected elbow in order to help promote fast healing of the affected area as well as minimizing the use of elbow.
  • Apply an ice pack on the affected area to help lessen the swelling and inflammation for at least 20-30 minutes for every 3-4 hours every day. Avoid applying ice directly on the skin, wrap the ice pack or bag of frozen vegetable using a towel and place it on the affected area.
  • Stabilize the joint of the elbow by using a splint, cast or compression bandage in order to help minimize movement as well as making the condition worse.
  • Seek the help of a physical therapist for some exercises in order to help restore the full range of motion to the affected area.
  • Keep the affected area elevated above the level of the heart to help in preventing the swelling and minimizing the pain.
  • Drink 2-3 glasses of herbal tea every day such as ginger tea, basil tea and chamomile tea. These can help lessen pain and inflammation of the affected area.
  • Seek medical help for follow-up appointments in order to help in assessing the healing of the affected area. The severity of the damage and fracture will be determined whether there is a need for surgery. Severe avulsion fractures of the tendons and ligaments needs surgery and areas which are not stable. There might be a need for the placement of pins, rods, wires, screws or plates in order to help connect the bones together as well as repair the damaged tendon and ligaments by sewing both ends together.

Fractured sternum

January 22nd, 2016 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Fractured sternum)

The sternum is also known as the breast bone which is located in front of the chest and connected to the 12 ribs on either side and forms the thoracic griddle. The thoracic griddle functions in protecting the internal organs such as the heart and lungs from injuries. The sternum also helps protect the thymus which is a gland that produces hemopoetic stem cells.

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FI8TnsQkQG8″]

A fractured sternum can either be due to a forceful blunt injury or a weakened sternum due to underlying conditions. People suffering from this condition can feel a severe pain in the middle chest and difficulty in breathing.

Causes

  • Vehicular accidents without airbags and seatbelts
  • Playing contact sports such as football
  • Suffering from diseases that cause weakening of the bone or pathologic fracture
  • Suffering from osteoporosis is prone to this injury if they are hit in the chest wall using a mild force.

Symptoms of fractured sternum

Fractured sternum

Severe pain that becomes worse especially when coughing and sneezing.

  • Severe pain that becomes worse especially when coughing and sneezing.
  • Tenderness, bruising and swelling of the affected area
  • Crepitus is a crunching sound that can be heard when broken ends of the bones are rubbing against each other. Crepitus usually happens when there is displacement or instability of the broken sternum.
  • Deformity of the ribcage
  • Pain is severe especially when lying in certain positions such as facing down or sideways

Treatment

  • Encourage the individual to rest to help with the fast healing of the affected area in 2-3 months. Avoid performing strenuous activities in order to prevent making the condition worse.
  • Apply an ice pack on the affected area to help lessen the swelling and pain. Wrap a few ice cubes in a towel and pat it over the affected area at least 20 minutes every two hours. Avoid applying ice directly on the skin in order to help prevent frostbite.
  • Take the prescribed anti-inflammatory medication in order to help lessen the swelling and pain.
  • Avoid applying pressure on the area and performing weightlifting or any other activities that places plenty of stress to the bone.
  • Perform exercises to improve posture, strength and flexibility to prevent the development of stiffness and weakness of the affected area.
  • Gradually return to activities or sports by wearing protective padding or chest guards to help minimize injuries on the sternum and prevent it from getting worse.

Exercises

Shoulder blade squeezes – start by sitting or stand tall with the back in a straight position. Squeeze the shoulder blade as far as possible without pain and remain in that position for 1-2 seconds and repeat at least 10 times. Just make sure that the symptoms will not worsen.

Perform deep breathing by sitting or standing tall and the back in straight position. Breathe in as deeply as possible without increasing the symptoms and then relax. Inhale with the lower lungs instead of elevating the shoulders and gently expand the stomach at least five times.