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Ways of treating psoriasis cracks and bleeding

Posted by A. Jones in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Ways of treating psoriasis cracks and bleeding)
psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder that causes formation of plaques that appears on the skin. Plaques are thickened, dry and reddened areas of the skin that develops scales on the surface. It causes itchiness and burning sensations, and these can crack and bleed and cause pain.

Causes of cracking and bleeding psoriasis

  • The affected areas are very dry due to loss of skin moisture and prone to develop cracks or fissures. The cracks become deepen over time.
  • The cracks become large and extend deeper to the lower level of skin where there are small blood vessels called capillaries. Breaking these capillaries results to bleeding.
  • Common areas in the body that develop plaques and susceptible to cracking and bleeding includes the knees, elbows, soles of the feet and palms of the hands.
  • Rubbing, scratching or scraping of the skin.
    psoriasis

    Common areas in the body that develop plaques and susceptible to cracking and bleeding includes the knees, elbows, soles of the feet and palms of the hands.

  • Regular movements and stretching of the skin

Treatment

  • Stop the bleeding. Apply a steady pressure on the area using a cloth or bandage for at least 10 minutes. Avoid lifting the bandage to check the wound. When bleeding stops, rinse the area using lukewarm or cool water to prevent development of infections.
  • Seal the crack using prescribed liquid bandage. It coats the affected area and it is flexible and waterproof. Bring the edges or cut together and spray or brush the liquid bandage on top of the affected area. The bandage dries in a minute and can last for a week.
  • Prescribed water tight medical tape to close the cracks. It keeps the wound moist for fast healing of the area. Use the sticky part of the bandage to close small cuts. Place bandage across the wound to hold it together.
  • Apply a layer of lip balm or petroleum jelly on small cut to protect the area from further irritations.
  • Soften the dry patches in lukewarm water for at least 15 minutes. Another alternative is adding Epsom salts, oils, colloidal oatmeal and Dead Sea salt to lessen the itchiness and the irritations. Pat dry the skin using a towel and then apply an emollient ointment, oil or cream on the area for fast healing.
  • Before sleeping at night apply ointment such as petroleum jelly on the wound. Cover the area to lock in the moisture overnight. Another alternative is using olive oil, vitamin E and shortening is also good for the condition. Protect the hands and feet by wearing cotton gloves and socks.
  • Moisturize the area at least 2 times every day to keep the area moist.
  • Prescribed medicated lotion, ointment or cream for fast healing of the wounds and prevent development of new ones.
  • Take a bath using warm water mixed with Epsom salt, mineral oil and olive oil. It relaxes the skin and gently removes scales or dead skin from the epidermis or outer layer of the skin.

FACT CHECK

https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/psoriasis/symptoms-causes/syc-20355840

https://www.healthline.com/health/psoriasis

Treating ear bleeding

Posted by A. Jones in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Treating ear bleeding)
ear bleeding

Ear bleeding is called otorrhea is a fluid discharge from the ears that includes blood. Oftentimes, the blood also includes pus and wax. Furthermore, bleeding in the ear can originate from other parts of the body.

Causes of ear bleeding

  • Ruptured eardrum due to foreign objects, infections, loud sounds or sudden changes in the pressure of air. Changes in air pressure can be caused by slapping the ear using the hand.
  • Fracture on the skull and bleeding will leak out of the ear or otorrhea and nose or rhinorrhea if blood vessels are ruptured.
  • Foreign bodies inside the ear can puncture the ear drum or cut a skin such as cotton swab, matchsticks and writing utensils. In ears of children includes beads, small toys or food.
  • Ear bleeding due to hemorrhagic fever which happen during the late stage of the fever. The virus breaks down the blood vessels and result to bleeding from several orifices such as the nostril, anus and the ears.
  • Otic polyp which is a benign growth found on the outer area of the ear canal or eardrum. It causes constant irritation that result to chronic infections.
  • Malignant otitis media or swimmer’s ear which is the infection of the outer ear. It causes bleeding in ears when the condition reaches the bones of the skull.
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation or DIC an abnormal clotting of the blood due to inflammation.

Symptoms

ear-bleeding

Ear pain and headache might also be present.

  • Fever
  • Weakness in the face
  • Buzzing sound in ears
  • Hearing loss
  • Ear pain and headache
  • Strong odor coming out of the ears
  • Disorientation
  • Dark circles under the eyes
  • lastly, severe symptoms that includes vision problems, dizziness, unusual size of the pupil, vomiting, bleeding nose, severe exhaustion and severe bleeding from the ear.

Treatment

  • Take the prescribed antibiotics to lessen the infection and the pain.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medication to lessen the pain and inflammation due to damage, infections and pressure problems.
  • Apply warm compress in the form of a clean wash cloth soaked in hot or warm water. Wring out excess water and then place it over the sore ear to lessen the discomfort and the pain.
  • Inhale steam to open the Eustachian tube and drain any fluid that causes the blockage. Get inside the bathroom, close all windows and run the shower in hot setting and inhale the steam.
  • White vinegar is rich in antibacterial properties and heals infections of the middle ear. Applying rubbing alcohol inside the ear helps dry up build up of fluid inside the ear.
  • Protect the ears by using ear covers or plugs to prevent debris and water from entering the ears and cause further irritation and worsen the condition.

Tips

  • Avoid picking the ears using objects such as hair clips, matchsticks and cotton swabs.
  • Avoid using earphones while the ear is in the healing process.
  • Avoid flushing the blood out of the ear using water or oil.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on ear bleeding is for learning purposes only. Learn to properly manage the condition by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

FACT CHECK

https://www.healthline.com/health/ear-bleeding

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320237.php

https://www.msdmanuals.com/home/ear,-nose,-and-throat-disorders/middle-ear-disorders/eardrum-perforation

First Aid Classes – Severe Bleeding from Wounds

Some wounds bleed more than others however if bleeding is severe workplace approved Training explains it can be very distressing for both passers by and the patient. As a first aider your aim is to firstly control the bleeding.

It is well known that applying pressure can help to control bleeding, however you must first establish if there is anything embedded in the wound as the treatment will be slightly different.

The aims are the same for both wounds with embedded objects and wounds that are clear, however when trying to control the bleeding, you would do so without pressing the object further into the wound.

The aims stated in workplace approved First Aid manual for all patients with bleeding wounds are:

  • To control the bleeding
  • Prevent and minimise the effects of shock
  • Minimise risk of infection
  • Arrange urgent medical assistance

Firstly, you should put on disposable gloves if there are any available. This is to protect both yourself and the patient. If required, you should remove or cut any clothing away in order to expose the wound.

Bleeding WoundsAs previously stated, applying pressure over the wound will help to control the bleeding. For a wound with no object(s) embedded within it, do this using your fingers or palm, however it is best practice to do this over a sterile dressing or a non-fluffy (so it doesn’t stick or leave fluff in the wound) clean pad, or you could ask the patient to apply pressure themselves if they are able. Secure the wound with a dressing and bandage if available, ensuring it is applied tight in order to maintain compression, however check to ensure there is still adequate blood flow to the limb.

However, if there is an object in the wound, First Aid Classes state you must compress the wound on either side of the object, to push the wound edges together. The dressing for a wound with an embedded object is also different. The wound should not just be covered and pressure applied to it. Instead, you should use padding on either side of the object and then bandage over the object, taking care not to press it into the wound.

To help to reduce the bleeding you should also elevate the injured body part above the level of the chest, whilst continuing to maintain pressure. If available, you could support the injured body part in an elevated position using a sling or bandaging. This will also minimise the swelling and this will in turn help ease any pain.

If the bleeding is not controlled, the patient is at risk of developing shock. This is a severe condition and can be fatal if not treated. As a first aider you must try to prevent and minimise the effects of shock by elevating the patients legs above the level of their chest. Ideally, workplace approved Training suggests laying them down on a blanket, both for their comfort and to protect them from cold.

Continue to monitor the patient for signs of shock whilst waiting for medical assistance, as well as observing their responsiveness, pulse and breathing.  It is important not to allow the patient to eat, drink or smoke during this time, in case surgery is needed.

You should also check the bandage for further bleeding coming through; you may need to apply a second dressing on top of the first. If it continues to strike through, First Aid Classes say you should completely redress the wound, ensuring that accurate pressure is applied to the site of bleeding.

REFERENCES

First Aid Manual (The Authorised Manual of St. John Ambulance, St Andrew’s Ambulance Association and the British workplace approved), 2006.

Candidates enrolled in standard first aid will learn to recognize and treat victims of severe bleeding. This page will focus on how to treat victims that are bleeding. The material posted on this page is for information purposes only, if you want to learn to recognize and treat bleeding victims through hands-on training take a standard first aid course in Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Regina or Saskatoon through a credible provider.

Bleeding is defined as blood escaping from the body through arteries, veins or capillaries. People can lose significant amounts of blood comfortably over a short period of time. The average body is designed to be able to cope with a lose of half a litre of blood for 15 to 20 minutes. This is why donating blood is safe for people. However, if larger amounts of blood that the 1/2 half litre are lost or if more blood is lost in a shorter period of time the body can enter into shock. Candidates need to be award that bleeding not only occurs externally but can also occur internally.

Signs and Symptoms of Bleeding:

This page will forgoe the explanation of what external bleeding is. Internal bleeding may be hidden and is usually the result of of injury to internal organs that result in haemorrhage into body cavities. Rescuers should rely on the mechanics of the injury when suspecting internal bleeding and notify emergency medical personal immediately. Signs and symptoms of internal bleeding include:

  • Skin becoming cool, cold pale and clammy.
  • Victims pulse becomes weak and rapid.
  • Victim may have difficulty breathing or shortness of breath.
  • Victim may feel dizzy of fain.
  • Victim may be nauseous or vomit.

3 Types of External Bleeding:

Rescuers may experience three different types of external bleeding. The following is a description of each:

  • Capillary bleeding: This is the most common bleeding which occurs from capillaries. In this injury blood slowly leaves the body in a steady viscous path.
  • Venous bleeding: This is bleeding that results in blood leaving in a steady flow. The blood may seem darker than arterial blood. Scenarios in which the victim has cut a larger blood vessel may involve significant blood flow.
  • Arterial bleeding: This is bleeding that results in blood from an artery spurting or pulsing out. The colour of the blood is typically bright in colour.

Treatment of External Bleeding:

Prior to treating any victim with bleeding that can not be stopped without rescuer intervention (more than a minor cut), rescuers must take the necessary precautions and immediately put on gloves. Prior to treating a

First Aid - Gauze

Candidates will learn to manage deadly bleeding by using sterile gauze

bleeding wound candidates must make sure that the airway, breathing and circulation are assessed and EMS has been notified (through a bystander preferably).

Prior to applying any dressing to a bleeding wound candidates should ensure that the victim is at rest. Putting the victim in a supported and resting position can help reduce blood loss by slowing circulation to a resting heart rate.

Candidates must place firm and direct pressure onto the wound. Candidates that have available first aid kits can use gauze and triangle bandages to create direct pressure through a loop tie. Rescuers can also use tensor bandages. Rescuers should be careful not to place the dressing or tie too tightly around the victim as to limit blood flow to the remainder of the extremity. Rescuers can check for distal circulation below the wound to assess blood flow and to check if the dressing has been tied too tightly. If the bleeding soaks through the gauze, dressing and / or the bandage, candidates should place more dressing or gauze over the wound. Do not remove the dressing as any clotting that has taken place will be adversely affected. The limb should be secure and supported while the dressing is being applied. Rescures should attempt to only use clean and sterile dressing on the wound. For additional pressure candidates can place a gloved hand over the wound.

For more information and to learn how to do hands-on treatment of bleeding wounds throughout the body enrol in a standard first aid course near you. Registration is quick and easy and can be completed on-line. Register with one of our training partners today.

 

 

Dealing with road rash

Posted by A. Jones in First Aid Injury Assessment - (Comments Off on Dealing with road rash)
ACL injury

Road rash are abrasions caused by falling onto and usually skidding across on asphalt after an accident from motorcycle, bike and skateboarding. The rubbing of skin and skidding across asphalt causes the skin to abrade and result to severe pain.

Abrasions from cyclists are called “road rash.” It usually results to mild bleeding or not at all but causes severe pain because it exposes many nerve endings.

Degrees of road rash

  • 1st degree- damages the epidermis and result to tenderness and redness.
  • 2nd degree- damages an area of the dermis. It causes scarring.
  • 3rd degree- damages the whole thickness of the skin and damages other tissues, muscle and nerves under the skin.
    Dealing with road rash

    Stop bleeding by applying pressure using a cloth or gauze. Put gauze on the bleeding area and apply pressure for at least a few minutes.

Treatment

  • Wash hands properly using warm water and soap to prevent infections. Use disposable gloves before starting to clean the affected area.
  • Stop bleeding by applying pressure using a cloth or gauze. Put gauze on the bleeding area and apply pressure for at least a few minutes.
  • Rinse the wound by running cool water over it to wash away loose dirt and other debris.
  • Wash the area using antibacterial soap and water. Wash only the area around the wound to wash out dirt and bacteria and prevent development of infection. Avoid getting the soap into the wound to prevent further irritations.
  • Use clean and sterilized tweezers in picking dirt, sand and splinters that is stuck in the wound. Then rinse the area using cool water when the debris is removed. Pat dry the wound, avoid rubbing to prevent causing pain. Splinters and other materials that are deeply lodged in the wound needs medical help.
  • Elevate the area above the level of the heart to lessen the pain and the swelling on the first 24-48 hours after the injury especially the wound in infected and severe.
  • Apply the prescribed antibiotic cream to prevent development of infections as it heals. Another alternative is applying petroleum jelly or aquaphor to the affected area to keep the area moist and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Cover the rash using a bandage to protect the area from dirt, irritations and infections. Use a non-stick bandage such as Telfa pad is good for the condition. Change bandages when it becomes wet and dirty. Reapply antibiotic cream before covering with fresh bandages.
  • Prescribed pain medications to lessen the pain and the inflammation.
  • Drink plenty of water at least 6-8 glasses of water every day to stay hydrated.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on road rash is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the signs and how it is treated by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

FACT CHECK

https://www.healthline.com/health/road-rash-treatment

https://www.wikihow.com/Treat-Road-Rash

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrasion_(medical)

Remedies for blood clot in the eye

Posted by A. Jones in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Remedies for blood clot in the eye)
blood clot

Blood clot in the eye is bleeding under the conjunctiva or the outer protective coating of the eyeball in the eye. It gradually changes color and disappear but sometimes blood clots in the eye can be caused by injuries and needs to be treated.

The white portion of the eye is layered by the conjunctiva with blood vessels and nerves. The blood vessels behind the eyes are very delicate and can easily rupture and result to blood clots. If not properly treated can cause a blurred vision and eventually reduced eye sight. Blood clots can also form in new born babies caused by changes in the pressure in the body of the infant during childbirth.

Causes

  • Eye injury
  • Constipation
  • Excessive strain on the eye
    blood clot

    Red spot or patch on the white area of the eye.

  • Excessive sneezing or coughing
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Medications such as blood thinners when taken excessively
  • Blood clotting disorders
  • Deficiency in Vitamin K
  • Over stressed
  • Severe infection of the eye

Symptoms

  • Red spot or patch on the white area of the eye
  • Eye pain
  • Itchiness or irritations in the eye
  • Sensation of fullness in the eye or under the eyelid
  • Blurred vision

Treatment

  • Prescribed lubrication for the eyes such as artificial tears to soothe the eyes. Avoid rubbing the eyes to prevent further irritations and worsen the condition.
  • Place a hot compress on the eyelid to lessen the pain and the irritations. Soak a clean facecloth in hot water. Place it in a plastic bag and then place it across the area for at least 5-7 times every day.
  • Soak a clean wash cloth in cold water. Wring out excess water from the cloth and then place it directly on the area for at least 1-2 minutes to lessen blood clots and the pain. Another alternative is wrapping ice cubes in a towel and compress the eye and splashing cold water into the affected eyes is also good for the condition. Repeat this process at least 4-5 times for 8-10 minutes.
  • Heat 2 glasses of water and add 1 tablespoon of salt. Stir well until salt is fully dissolved. Let the solution cool down to room temperature. Wash the affected eye thoroughly using this solution at least 2-3 times every day to flush out foreign particles and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Prescribed antibiotic eye drop if the blood clot in the eye is caused by external infections.
  • Regular exercises by walking briskly for at least 30-45 minutes every day to increase blood circulation and dissolve and prevents formation of blood clots. Low impact aerobic exercises such as dancing, roller skating, swimming and cargo training equipment are also good for the condition.

FACT CHECK

https://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/hemorrhage.htm

https://www.healthline.com/health/retinal-artery-occlusion

https://www.epainassist.com/eye-pain/blood-clot-in-eye

Elbow hyperextension injury

Posted by A. Jones in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Elbow hyperextension injury)
Elbow hyperextension injury

Elbow hyperextension injury happens when the elbow is bent beyond the normal range of movement and damages the bones, ligaments and other structures of the elbow. Injuries can be caused by performing strenuous exercises such as playing sports and falling with outstretched arm.

Symptoms of elbow hyperextension

  • Swelling of the affected area
  • Pain in the anterior area of the elbow
  • Severe pain when extending the arm
  • Numbness of the affected area
  • The biceps contracts and there is pain and difficulty to straighten the arm.
  • Pain when touching the elbow
    Elbow hyperextension injury

    Take plenty of rest. Avoid activities such as extending and flexing the elbows for fast healing of the condition. Avoid drinking alcohol to prevent swelling and delays the healing.

  • Stiffness of the elbow and arm
  • Loss of strength of the elbow and arm
  • Muscle spasms in the biceps when straightening the arm
  • The affected area is red and blotchy
  • Deformity of the elbow
  • Problems with blood circulation in the elbow and hand

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest. Avoid activities such as extending and flexing the elbows for fast healing of the condition. Avoid drinking alcohol to prevent swelling and delays the healing.
  • Icing the affected area to relieve of the swelling and the pain. Put few ice cubes in a plastic bag and wrap it in a towel before placing to the area for at least 10-20 minutes at a time every hour after the injury. Another alternative is using an ice pack is also good for the condition.
  • Compress the area using an ACE elastic bandage, wrapped around the injured elbow to prevent unnecessary movements and for fast healing. It also stops and relieve of the swelling and pain. Avoid wrapping it too tight to prevent problems with circulation. If the area under the wrap causes pain and numbness loosen the wrap.
  • Elbow brace to immobilize the elbow and prevent unnecessary movements and for proper healing of the affected area.
  • Pain medications to relieve of the pain and the swelling.
  • Elevate the elbow above the level of the heart to lessen the swelling. While lying down, place the elbow in couple of pillows to keep it in a higher position. When sitting down put the elbow in a sling.
  • When pain starts to subside and capable of moving the elbow, perform gentle rehabilitation exercises with the help of the physical therapist for fast healing, lessen the pain and restore range of movement of the affected elbow.

Tips

  • Maintain proper form when playing contact sports or performing strenuous physical activities with the help of a qualified coach or instructor.
  • Do not use heat for at least 3 days such as hot baths, saunas and hot pads while in the healing stage.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol prevent the risk of bleeding and worsen the condition and delays the healing.
  • Avoid massage for 3 days to prevent further irritations.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on elbow hyperextension injury is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the indications and how it is managed by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

FACT CHECK

https://www.healthline.com/health/hyperextended-elbow

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321614.php

http://www.universityorthopaedic.com/sports-medicine/elbow-injuries-conditions/168-hyperextension-injury-of-the-elbow.html

Cellulitis

Posted by A. Jones in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Cellulitis)
Cellulitis

Cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that can be potentially serious. This condition typically appears as a swollen and red rash that is painful and warm to the touch. Cellulitis usually occurs on the skin located at the lower legs but can also occur in other parts of the body such as the face and arms. Cellulitis arises if bacteria enters your body through a break in your skin. If left untreated, cellulitis can be life-threatening as it can spread to your lymph nodes and bloodstream. Cellulitis is however not contagious, which means it cannot spread from person to person.

Cellulitis is a common disease and can affect anyone at any age or race, however, cellulitis is more common in middle-aged and elderly people.

At times, cellulitis appears in the area where there is a break in the skin, such as skin near surgical wounds or skin ulcers.

The common types of bacteria responsible for cellulitis are named Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, but there are other types of bacteria that can also cause cellulitis from happening.

Common causes

  • Injuries that tear or break the skin
  • Infections that occur after surgery
  • Skin conditions like eczema or chickenpox
  • Dirty foreign objects in the skin
  • Bone infections
    Cellulitis

    An area of the skin that is discolored red that tends to expand.

Signs and symptoms of cellulitis

  • An area of the skin that is discolored red that tends to expand
  • Swelling
  • Tenderness
  • Pain
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Red spots on the skin
  • Formation of blisters on the skin
  • Skin dimpling

There are numerous risk factors that contribute to increasing the chances of contracting the condition, these include:

  • Diabetes
  • A break in the skin
  • Circulatory problems
  • Liver disease
  • Skin disorders like eczema

It is important that you know how to identify the signs and symptoms and once you do, you should seek medical attention immediately. Seek immediate care if:

  • You notice a red, swollen rash on your skin that rapidly changes in size
  • If the individual develops a fever with the symptoms

You should still see your doctor even you don’t have a fever but a red rash that constantly changes in size. Do not wait for more symptoms to appear before you seek medical attention as it can get worse over time if left untreated and potentially become fatal.

The condition is usually treated with antibiotics through oral intake or intravenous method.

FACT CHECK

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cellulitis/

https://www.healthline.com/health/cellulitis

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cellulitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20370762

Dealing with elbow collateral ligament injury

Posted by A. Jones in Muscle Injuries - (Comments Off on Dealing with elbow collateral ligament injury)
elbow collateral ligament injury

Elbow collateral ligament injury is common among athletes. Generally, the ligament is found in the inside or medial part of the elbow or the small finger side of the arm. It connects bone together and control movements of the joints. It functions for the stability of the elbow.

Elbow movements that cause bending and twisting of the elbow such as javelin throwing, throwing of a baseball, ice hockey and racquet sports results to excessive stressing of the elbow. Furthermore, this condition can also happen to non athlete people such as falling on an outstretched arm or strong twisting of the arm and cause tearing of the ligaments of the elbow.

Symptoms of ulnar collateral ligament tear

  • At first, bruising at interior elbow after the injury
  • Pain, tenderness and swelling of the affected elbow
    elbow collateral ligament injury

    Stiffness or incapable of making the elbow straight.

  • Weakened grip or numbness and tingling sensations in the fingers.
  • Stiffness or incapable of making the elbow straight
  • Severe elbow pain
  • A popping sound can be heard when moving the elbow
  • Incapable of throwing normally
  • Tingling or numbness sensations that spreads down the ring and the small fingers
  • A sense of looseness or instability of the elbow
  • Incapable of performing regular activities such as lifting small objects or carrying something by the hand.

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected elbow. Avoid performing activities that cause pain in the area for fast healing of the condition.
  • Apply ice using an ice pack. Wrap the ice pack using a towel or a cloth before placing to the area for at least 10-15 minutes to lessen the bleeding, the swelling and the inflammation on the first 48 hours after the injury. The coldness will numb the skin and lessen the pain. Another alternative is soaking a clean washcloth in cool water, and then wrap it around the pack of ice and place on the area is also good for the condition.
  • Compress the area using an elastic bandage. It gives gentle pressure on the tissue around the affected area. It also supports the affected area, lessen the swelling and for proper flow of blood in the area. Do not wrap too tightly to prevent problems with circulations. Take off the bandages at least 2 times every day. Rest the area for a few minutes and then wrap it again.
  • Elevate the affected elbow above the heart to lessen the swelling of the area and increase flow of blood. When resting, prop the area in couple of pillows to keep it in a raised position.
  • Take the prescribed pain medications to reduce the inflammation and the pain.
  • When pain subsides perform gentle exercises with the help of the physical therapist for some strengthening exercises around the affected joint of the elbow, restore range of movement of the elbow and lessen the pain.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on elbow collateral ligament injury is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the indications and how it is managed by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

FACT CHECK

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulnar_collateral_ligament_of_elbow_joint

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1230902-overview

https://www.orthobullets.com/shoulder-and-elbow/3079/medial-ulnar-collateral-ligament-injury-valgus-instability

Treating skier’s thumb

Posted by A. Jones in Being Prepared - (Comments Off on Treating skier’s thumb)
skier’s thumb

Skier’s thumb is an injury to the soft tissue or ligament that attaches the bones of the thumb together. This condition is also called gamekeeper’s thumb. It is a chronic injury that develops due to repeated stretching if the ulnar collateral ligament in the thumb.

Scottish fowl hunters, gamekeepers, athletes playing volleyball are susceptible to this condition. People falling onto an outstretched hand while holding a ski pole usually on skiers.

Causes of skier’s thumb

  • Falling on outstretched hand and jams into a packed snow at high speed.
  • Falling on outstretched hand while holding a ski pole on the palm of the hand.
  • Vehicular accidents with the thumb on the steering wheel
  • The thumb is bent in abnormal position

Symptoms

skier’s thumb

Pain at the bottom of the thumb in the web space between the thumb and the index finger.

  • Swelling of the thumb
  • Pain at the bottom of the thumb in the web space between the thumb and the index finger
  • Wrist pain
  • Incapable to grasp or weakness when grasping between the thumb and the index finger
  • Tenderness along the index finger on the side of the thumb
  • Blue or black discoloration of the skin on the affected thumb
  • Severe pain when moving the thumb in all directions

Treatment

  • Rest the affected thumb as much as possible.
  • Immobilize the thumb by wrapping the area using an ACE wrap or use a wrist brace. Put the thumb in the neutral position to keep it immobilized. It will prevent unnecessary movement, lessen the pain and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Apply ice compress on the affected thumb for at least 35 minutes at a time, 4 times every day to lessen the pain and the inflammation. Wrap ice compress in a small cloth or a face towel before placing to the area to prevent further irritation and worsen the condition. Another alternative is using a bag of frozen vegetable such as peas or corn is also good for the condition.
  • Wrap the affected thumb using an elastic wrap to maintain pressure on the sprain.
  • Elevate the affected area above the level of the heart to lessen the swelling and internal bleeding. When lying raise the hand in couple of pillows to keep it elevated.
  • Take the prescribed anti-inflammatory medications to lessen the inflammation and the pain.
  • Seek the help of the physical therapist for some rehabilitation exercises for strength, flexibility, restore range of movement and lessen the pain

Tips

  • Skiers should discard their ski pole during falls. Falling with outstretched hand without the ski pole will minimize the chances of an injury.
  • Use poles with finger-groove grips and not putting restraining devices such as closed grip or a wrist strap.
  • When driving, keep the thumbs along with the other fingers outside of the steering wheel.
  • Stretch the hand and the muscles of the finger every day.
  • Wear a thumb stabilizer for protection of the ulnar collateral ligament without limiting the functions and movement of the hand.

FACT CHECK

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulnar_collateral_ligament_injury_of_the_thumb

https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/skiers-thumb#1

https://www.emedicinehealth.com/skiers_thumb/article_em.htm

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At St Mark James Training we work hard to ensure accurate and useful information on our blog website. However, the information that we post on our website is purely for educational purposes and should not be used as diagnosis or treatment. If you need medical advise please contact a medical professional

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