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How to treat thenar eminence pain

January 2nd, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on How to treat thenar eminence pain)

Thenar eminence pain is pain felt at the soft muscular round region at the bottom of the thumb. It is caused by overusing the thumb and becomes inflamed. It causes difficulties with movements such as handling of the latch, opening of drawers and opening of the door.

The thenar eminence is a group of three short muscles found on the palm of the human hand at the bottom of the thumb. They form a fleshy mass on the lateral side of the palm used for the movements of the thumb. The skin on top of this area is stimulated when eliciting a palmomental reflex.

Symptoms

  • Tightness of the thenar eminence
  • Pain can be felt around the soft muscular rounded area at the bottom of the thumb
  • Development of nodule at the bottom of the thumb along the surface of the palm
  • The thumb becomes locked after flexing
  • Neurovascular compression

Causes

thenar eminence pain

Pain can be felt around the soft muscular rounded area at the bottom of the thumb.

  • Due to fine and repetitive kind of work which result to overusing of the thumb. It includes constant typing on mobile phone and computers and also work of a massage therapist.
  • Hammering and sewing
  • Hormonal changes in women especially postmenopausal
  • Vehicular accidents and falls
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome, a condition where there is pressure on the median nerve found in the wrist

Treatment

  • Splint the thumb to prevent unnecessary movement, lessen the pain and for fast healing of the condition.
  • Take the prescribed anti-inflammatory medications to lessen the pain due to thenar eminence.
  • Prescribed steroid ejections to lessen the pain and the inflammation.
  • Apply cold compress on the affected area. place a few ice cubes in a plastic bag and then place to the affected thumb for at least 10 minutes several times every day to lessen the pain and the inflammation.
  • Massage the affected area with the help of the massage therapist to relax and lessen the tightness of the muscles.
  • Gently stretched and loosen the affected thumb to prevent making the area stiff and worsen the condition.
  • Palpitations is done on the neck and adjustments with the help of the physiotherapist

Tips

  • Avoid activities that need repetitive use of the thumb.
  • Regular breaks to allow the muscles of the thumb relax and perform gentle stretches for the hand to avoid stiffness of the muscles.

Dealing with an infected ear piercing

January 1st, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Being Prepared - (Comments Off on Dealing with an infected ear piercing)

An infected ear piercing occurs when organisms infects the piercing hole and starts causing problems that result to different varieties of symptoms. A piercing is essentially an open wound.

Causes of an infected ear piercing

  • Using unsterilized piercing equipment
  • Touching the piercing area or around the area of the ears with dirty hands.
  • Inserting unsterile posts
  • Allergic reactions to the materials of the posts usually nickel which result to itchiness of the affected area.
  • Wearing tight earring especially or the clasp is closed tightly or having a short post which affects normal flow of blood on the earlobe and makes the affected person susceptible to infections.
  • Using bad quality of earrings such as earrings with rough post tends to scratch the piercing channel or the hole when wearing them.
  • Inserting the earrings to a new piercing without using a mirror and cause pain while still in the healing stage.
  • Inserting earring at a wrong angle especially done by children.

    infected ear

    Wash hands properly before touching or cleaning the piercing to prevent further irritation and worsen the condition.

Symptoms

  • Red and inflamed streaks or marks on the skin that spreads from the piercing area.
  • Severe redness, pain, swelling, heat or tenderness around the affected area.
  • Tender or swollen lymph glands above or below the piercing area.
  • Mild drainage or bleeding from the site which is in the process of healing, but sometimes there will be swelling with thick yellow-green pus-like that drains from the affected area and redness.
  • Sore and swelling glands in the neck around the jawline
  • Fever
  • Itching and burning sensations

Treatment

  • Wash hands properly before touching or cleaning the piercing to prevent further irritation and worsen the condition.
  • Do not remove the piercing, to prevent closing of the hole and trap the infections.
  • Avoid using hydrogen peroxide, alcohol or antibiotic ointment to prevent further irritation on the skin and slow down the healing of the affected area.
  • Apply a warm compress or moist compress on the affected area which can be in the form of a clean washcloth soaked in hot water. Wring out excess water and place it on the area for at least 20 minutes every day to eliminate the pus.
  • Avoid swimming in pools, rivers, lakes, hot tubs and other places that are contaminated by harmful bacteria and worsen the condition.
  • Keep clothing away from the affected area to prevent excessive rubbing or friction and further irritated the skin and worsen the condition.

Tips

  • To avoid infection, piercing of the ears should be done by a professional. Avoid doing it at home
  • The tools used for piercing should be sterile and the earring should be new and in a sterile package.
  • After the piercing the ears should be cleaned at least two times every day using sterile saline solution. Avoid turning the jewelry to prevent further damage and cause an infection. Clean around the piercing without removing the earrings.

Remedies for bug inside the ear

January 1st, 2018 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Remedies for bug inside the ear)

A bug inside the ear is very scary.  Bugs such as cockroaches,  ladybugs, moths and beetles can get inside the ear while sleeping or during outdoor activities. They crawl inside the ear for warmth and make them safe.

Bugs inside the ear can cause hearing loss, infections and damage to the ear. Bugs inside the ear result to a ruptured eardrum. If the bug is not removed completely there is a high risk of developing an infection.

Symptoms of bugs inside the ear

  • Inflammation, pain and irritation
  • Swelling
  • Redness of the area
  • Drainage from the ear such as pus or blood when the ear has injury
  • Biting or stinging sensations
  • Loss of hearing or dizziness

Treatment

bug inside ear

Drainage from the ear such as pus or blood when the ear has injury.

  • Stay calm, avoid movements to prevent lodging of the bug further inside the ear or cause it to crawl further back and cause injuries to the sensitive inner ear or the eardrum.
  • Avoid using tools such as tweezers or cotton swabs to prevent pushing further the bug inside the ear or accidentally injuring the nerves and worsen the condition.
  • Remove the bug by wiggling the ear. Tilt the affected ear toward the ground and grasp the pinna , located outside of the ear and wiggle the ear. If the bug is not too deep inside the ear, it will just fall out on its own.
  • Flush the ear using warm water with a dropper.
  • Another alternative is killing the bug using mineral oil. Use 1-2 drops of mineral oil or olive oil inside the ear canal to eliminate the bug. After the bugs has come out of the ear, clean the ear canal using warm water. If there are infections such as bleeding or blood while cleaning the area, apply the prescribed over-the-counter antiseptic ointment to lessen the risk of infection and worsen the condition.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter medications such as steroid otic suspension or cortisporin to lessen the infections or abrasion inside the ear.
  • Soak cotton ball in alcohol and use it to get the bug or whatever insect is inside the ear. Be careful this procedure causes pain. The smell of alcohol forces the bug to come out of the ear.

Tips

  • Keep bedroom and other sleeping areas clean to prevent attacks of insects.
  • When camping outdoors, wear repellent for bugs and completely sealing the tent to prevent bugs and other insects from entering the ears.

Dealing with febrile seizure

December 19th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Dealing with febrile seizure)

A febrile seizure is an occurrence of unconsciousness accompanied by strong convulsions frequently with fever due to common childhood illness such as flu, common cold or even ear infections. Children 6 months and 5 years are susceptible to seizures with onset of fever.

Causes

  • A high temperature of the body
  • Viral infection such as roseola and flu which are usually accompanied by high fever
  • Post-immunization seizures such as diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus or measles-mumps-rubella vaccinations. The affected child develops a low-fever after the vaccination and may cause seizures.

Symptoms

febrile seizure

Children 6 months and 5 years are susceptible to seizures with onset of fever.

  • The seizures can range from mild and eventually becomes severe shaking or tightening of the muscles.
  • Fever higher than 100.4 F or 38.0 C.
  • Losing consciousness
  • Shaking or jerking of arms and legs
  • Stiff neck
  • Vomiting
  • Severe sleepiness
  • Breathing difficulties

Treatment

  • Keep the child safe by placing him/her on a stable surface to prevent falling caused by uncontrolled movement. Place the child on the floor or on top of the bed. Another way is simply laying him/her on the lap and supported by both hands. If the child is already safe avoid moving him/her. Make sure the area of the child is clear of objects such as furniture to prevent the striking the furniture accidentally.
  • Remove and loosen clothing from the waist up especially around the neck
  • If the child vomits, turn the child onto her/his side to prevent difficulties in breathing. Avoid sticking anything into the mouth of the child to prevent choking or involuntarily biting the object.
  • Give the child the prescribed over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lessen the pain. Avoid giving ibuprofen to children six months or below to prevent making the condition worse.
  • Apply wet and cool cloth on the face and neck of the child to lower the fever and soothe the child.
  • Give the child a bath using lukewarm water, to relax the body and lessen the fever and make the child comfortable and clean. If the child is still having the seizures, just give the child sponge bath. Avoid using cold water or rubbing alcohol in lowering the temperature of the body too quickly to prevent shock.
  • Give the child plenty of sleep in a cool and comfortable room to lessen the fever.
  • Wrap the affected child in blankets if he/she feels chilly.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on a febrile seizure is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize and manage this condition by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

Treatment for anal itching

December 18th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Being Prepared - (Comments Off on Treatment for anal itching)

Anal itching is also called pruritus ani which is a persistent need to scratch the bottom. It can happen at any age but usually common between ages 30 and 50. Anal itching can be caused by skin related disorders that includes psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, excessive pressure in the anal area, excessive sweating and moisture around the anus, improper wiping of the area after a bowel movement and exposure to chemical-based perfumed.

Causes of anal itching

  • Foods that cause irritation in the anus during bowel movement includes chocolate, caffeine, nuts, beer, dairy products spicy foods
  • Infections from pinworms or yeast
  • Genital warts
  • Hemorrhoids can cause swollen blood vessels in the anal region

Symptoms

  • Itchiness after a bowel movement at night.
  • Development of rashes in the anal with breaks in the skin or a weeping discharge
  • Strong urge to scratch the affected area
  • Dryness, redness, burning and soreness
  • Swelling ulcers and development of rashes around the anal area

Treatment

anal-itching

Itchiness after a bowel movement at night.

  • Use over-the-counter measures such as creams with hydrocortisone 1 % or zinc oxide to reduce the itchiness of the area. apply hydrocortisone cream for at least two weeks to prevent damage on the skin
  • Take the prescribed anti-parasitic medication to stop pinworms and bacterial infections.
  • Increase consumption of fiber to prevent anal constipation. Fiber is good for healthy digestion and softens and increase bulk of stool. Foods rich in fibers such as potatoes, beans, brown rice, prunes, fresh fruits, peas and broccoli. Another alternative is taking the prescribed fiber supplements
  • Use apple cider vinegar to lessen anal itching due to yeast and fungal infection.
  • Oatmeal is rich in anti-irritating and anti-inflammatory properties that lessen the inflammation and the itchiness of the affected area.

Treating ear bleeding

December 12th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Basic First Aid Skills - (Comments Off on Treating ear bleeding)

Ear bleeding is called otorrhea is a fluid discharge from the ears that includes blood. Oftentimes, the blood also includes pus and wax. Bleeding in the ear can originate from other parts of the body.

Causes of ear bleeding

  • Ruptured eardrum due to foreign objects, infections, loud sounds or sudden changes in the pressure of air. Changes in air pressure can be caused by slapping the ear using the hand.
  • Fracture on the skull and bleeding will leak out of the ear or otorrhea and nose or rhinorrhea if blood vessels are ruptured.
  • Foreign bodies inside the ear can puncture the ear drum or cut a skin such as cotton swab, matchsticks and writing utensils. In ears of children includes beads, small toys or food.
  • Ear bleeding due to hemorrhagic fever which happen during the late stage of the fever. The virus breaks down the blood vessels and result to bleeding from several orifices such as the nostril, anus and the ears.
  • Otic polyp which is a benign growth found on the outer area of the ear canal or eardrum. It causes constant irritation that result to chronic infections.
  • Malignant otitis media or swimmer’s ear which is the infection of the outer ear. It causes bleeding in ears when the condition reaches the bones of the skull.
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation or DIC an abnormal clotting of the blood due to inflammation.

Symptoms

ear-bleeding

Ear pain and headache might also be present.

  • Fever
  • Weakness in the face
  • Buzzing sound in ears
  • Hearing loss
  • Ear pain and headache
  • Strong odor coming out of the ears
  • Disorientation
  • Dark circles under the eyes
  • Severe symptoms that includes vision problems, dizziness, unusual size of the pupil, vomiting, bleeding nose, severe exhaustion and severe bleeding from the ear.

Treatment

  • Take the prescribed antibiotics to lessen the infection and the pain.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medication to lessen the pain and inflammation due to damage, infections and pressure problems.
  • Apply warm compress in the form of a clean wash cloth soaked in hot or warm water. Wring out excess water and then place it over the sore ear to lessen the discomfort and the pain.
  • Inhale steam to open the Eustachian tube and drain any fluid that causes the blockage. Get inside the bathroom, close all windows and run the shower in hot setting and inhale the steam.
  • White vinegar is rich in antibacterial properties and heals infections of the middle ear. Applying rubbing alcohol inside the ear helps dry up build up of fluid inside the ear.
  • Protect the ears by using ear covers or plugs to prevent debris and water from entering the ears and cause further irritation and worsen the condition.

Tips

  • Avoid picking the ears using objects such as hair clips, matchsticks and cotton swabs.
  • Avoid using earphones while the ear is in the healing process.
  • Avoid flushing the blood out of the ear using water or oil.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on ear bleeding is for learning purposes only. Learn to properly manage the condition by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

Dealing with ligamentous laxity

December 11th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Being Prepared - (Comments Off on Dealing with ligamentous laxity)

Ligamentous laxity is condition where an individual has loose ligaments that cause chronic pain in the body. It usually involves all the joints in the body and known as generalized joint hypermobility. The joints are easily extended far from its normal range of movement.

The ligament which connects the joints becomes severely loose. It can also be due to weak muscles that surrounds the joints. The joints in the knees, shoulders, wrist, elbows and fingers are usually affected by this condition. Children are susceptible to this condition because their connective tissues are not yet fully developed. As the child becomes older the ability to hyperextend and the laxity of the joints becomes reduced.

Causes of ligamentous laxity

  • Bone shape or the depth of the sockets of the joint
  • Poor sense of proprioception, or the ability to sense how far he/she is stretching.
  • A family history of hypermobility

    ligamentous-laxity

    Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medication to lessen the inflammation and the pain.

  • Injuries that cause damaging or overstretching the ligaments.
  • Some conditions such as cleidocranial dysostosis, Marfan syndrome, Down syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome can affect the elasticity of the ligaments.

Symptoms

  • Inability of the loose ligaments to support the joints and increases the risk of having injuries with ligamentous laxity
  • People over 40 yrs old will have recurrent problems with the joint and usually suffer from chronic pain.
  • Poor limb position can result to degenerative conditions of the joint.
  • Frequently suffering from sprained ankle, shoulder dislocations, back problems and knee effusions.
  • People with sedentary lifestyle usually have back pain
  • High risk of bone dislocation
  • Capable of bending the elbows, knees or hips beyond the normal range of movement.

Treatment

  • Allow the site. Avoid engaging in vigorous activities to prevent overextending and dislocating the joints.
  • Apply ice pack on the area to lessen the pain and the inflammation.
  • Cover the site using compression bandage to reduce the discomfort and the swelling. Avoid wrapping it too tight to prevent problems with circulation. If the skin turns blue or violet under the wrap, loosen the wrap.
  • Elevate the area above the level of the heart to alleviate the discomfort and inflammation. Raise the area in couple of pillows to keep it elevated.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medication to lessen the inflammation and the pain.
  • Apply heat on the area to lessen the stiffness and the spasms of muscles. Heat can be in the form of a hot water bottle or a hot compress.
  • Consult a physical therapist for suitable rehabilitation exercises to restore the range of movement of the area.

Remedies for boxer’s fracture

December 11th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Skeletal Injuries - (Comments Off on Remedies for boxer’s fracture)

A boxer’s fracture is a break through the bones of hands that forms the knuckles. The fractures happen in the metacarpal bone that attaches the ring finger or the little finger to the wrist known as the fourth and the fifth metacarpal bones.

It can also cause a break in the neck of the second and third metacarpal bones. The second metacarpal bone attaches the index finger to the wrist, and the third metacarpal attaches the middle finger to the wrist.

Causes of boxer’s fracture

Punching a hard object or a wall with a closed fist but can also happen when the hand is not closed and strikes a hard object.

The stress on the bone will result to a break in the weakest part which is the neck of the bone, found below the knuckle.

boxers-fracture

Punching a hard object or a wall with a closed fist but can also happen when the hand is not closed and strikes a hard object.

Symptoms

  • Severe pain or tenderness of the affected area
  • Depressed knuckle
  • Pain with movement of the hand or fingers
  • Snapping or popping sensation can be felt in the affected bone
  • The hand swelling, discolored or bruise around the injured area
  • Deformity of the broken bone or the knuckle
  • Abnormal movement of the fragments of the broken bone
  • Sometimes, the fracture can cause a cut in the skin which needs immediate treatment

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected area. Avoid performing activities that further irritates the area and worsen the condition.
  • Apply ice on the area. Ice can be in the form of an ice pack. Wrap ice in a towel or a piece of cloth before placing to the area for at least 10-15 minutes to lessen the swelling and the pain. If ice is not available, another alternative is soaking a clean towel in cold water, and then place to the affected area is good for the condition.
  • Elevate the area above the level of the heart to lessen the swelling. When lying down, raise the area in couple of pillows to keep it elevated.
  • Wash cuts in the affected area using soap and water immediately and cover it with clean bandage to lessen the risk of developing infections and worsen the condition.
  • Immobilize the area by using a splint to prevent unnecessary movement and prevent causing damage to surrounding muscles, tendons, blood vessels, ligaments and nerves. Keep splint dry all the time to maintain their strength.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter pain medications such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lessen the pain and the swelling.

Tips

  • Avoid situations in which an injury can happen such as fist fights and punching a hard object due to anger or frustration to lessen the risk of a boxer’s fracture.
  • Performing regular exercises and taking calcium supplements to lessen the weakening of the bones that happens naturally due to age.

Disclaimer / More Information

The material posted on this page on a boxer’s fracture is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the indications and how it is managed by taking a first aid and CPR class with one of our training providers.

Dealing with fibrositis

November 20th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Being Prepared - (Comments Off on Dealing with fibrositis)

Fibrositis is an inflammation of the small, tough and muscular nodules found between the shoulder blades. When these muscles are stressed and become tense, tiny buds of tissue protrude through the weak areas in the membranous capsule of the muscle and become pinched and short of blood. The nodule will cause pain, press the nerves and result to toothache-like pain or neuralgia down the arm.

Fibrositis usually affects the muscular regions of the lower back, shoulder, arms, neck hips, chest and the thighs. People aged between 30 and 60 are prone to this condition. It affects women more than men.

Symptoms of fibrositis

  • Weakness and stiffness
  • Presence of nodules on areas which are tender when touched or called trigger points
  • Fatigue
  • Sudden and painful spasms of muscles when performing activities
  • Painful muscles
  • Difficulty remaining asleep

    fibrositis

    Sudden and painful spasms of muscles when performing activities.

Causes

  • Autoimmune disorder or an imbalance in brain chemicals
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Injury to the muscle
  • Stress
  • Viral infections
  • Poor nutrition
  • Exposure to cold or dampness
  • Fatigue or overworking
  • History of the disorders which result to inflammation of the joint such as polyarteritis.

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected area for fast healing of the condition.
  • Apply heat on the affected area to lessen the pain. Heat can be in the form of an electric heating pad, heat lamps, and hot compresses. Another alternative is taking a hot shower is also good for the condition.
  • Perform exercises such as swimming in a heated pool to lessen the spasm and stiffness of the affected muscles.
  • Use the prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen and aspirin or clycooxygenase-2 inhibitors to lessen the pain and the inflammation.
  • Massage gently the painful areas to lessen the inflammation and the pain.
  • Perform some relaxation and breathing techniques such as yoga to prevent stress.
  • Biofeedback for the condition to relax the contracted muscles. Biofeedback uses different relaxation exercises that includes deep breathing, meditation, which focusing the thought and letting go of negative emotions, and guided imagery, which is concentrating on specific image such texture and color of an orange to focus the mind and feeling more relaxed.
  • Injection of the prescribed cortisone to the affected area to lessen the pain and the inflammation.

Tips

  • Perform general conditioning exercises and stretching is needed to lessen the pain caused by fibrositis.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol and caffeine to prevent difficulty in sleeping.
  • Avoid straining the muscles of the shoulder such as lifting heavy weights.
  • Avoid spasms and cramping of shoulder muscles by performing measures that lessens the stress.

How to treat ischiogluteal bursitis

November 20th, 2017 | Posted by corinne grace in Being Prepared - (Comments Off on How to treat ischiogluteal bursitis)

Ischiogluteal bursitis is a condition that happens in the hip joint. In this condition, the affected bursa is found between the ischial tuberosity or part of the pelvic bone and the tendon of the hamstring muscle. The hamstring muscle is found at the bottom of the pelvic bone and is connected at the top end of the tibia or the lower leg bone.

Causes of ischiogluteal bursitis

  • Prolonged and repetitive activities that puts plenty of stress on the affected area.
  • Prolonged sitting on hard surfaces
  • Performing activities that requires repetitive kicking, jumping and running
  • Direct blow to the ischiogluteal bursa such as falling down on hard surface
  • Poor core stability
  • Stiffness of the joint of the hips
  • Inappropriate and excessive training

    ischiogluteal-bursitis

    Pain while flexing the knee against resistance.

  • Neural tightness
  • Poor biomechanics such as excessive length of stride
  • Chronic gout and ischial pain
  • Inadequate rehabilitation from previous injury on the buttock
  • Inadequate warm up
  • Leg length discrepancy

Symptoms

  • Pain while stretching the hamstring
  • Tenderness and pain in the ischial tuberosity
  • Pain while flexing the knee against resistance
  • Pain becomes severe when sitting
  • Severe pain while walking, running, kicking, jumping, climbing stairs and sitting on hard surface
  • Pain while accelerating speed during running

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest especially the affected area during the first 72 hours after the symptoms of bursitis is appears.
  • Use a cane for a short period to lessen pressure placed on the affected area when moving around.
  • Apply ice pack on the affected area for at least 3-4 times every day for the next 24-48 hours to lessen the inflammation and the swelling. Avoid ice directly on the skin. Wrap the ice pack using a towel or a piece of cloth before placing to the area to prevent frostbite and worsen the condition.
  • Heat can be applied to the area in the form of hot packs. Heat increases flow of blood and oxygen tension. Wrap heat packs in a towel before placing for at least 30 minutes, 2 times every day to lessen the spasms and the stiffness of the affected area.
  • Gradually increase movement of the injured joint to prevent stiffness or become frozen. With the help of the physical therapist perform strengthening exercise to restore the normal range movement of the affected area. the therapeutic rehabilitation exercises includes stretching exercises for flexibility of a tight hamstring muscles and lessen the pressure placed on the bursa and strengthening exercises to restore muscle imbalances and lessen the symptoms.
  • Prescribed corticosteroid injection where it is injected into the bursa to lessen the pain and the inflammation. Corticosteroid is a hormonal substance that lessens the inflammation. This medication is mixed with a local anesthetic and works on the joint within five minutes.
  • In a glass filled with warm milk add 2 tablespoons of turmeric. Consume this mixture at least two times every day. Turmeric is rich with anti-inflammatory properties that lessen the pain.